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is the assistant attorney general of the civil rights division in washington, dc, he was nominated for that position by president obama and sworn in in october of 2009 and we are all the lucky -- we are all very lucky that that happened in october of 2009. tom has spent his entire career in public service and on protecting the civil rights of our most vulnerable people. tom actually joined the civil rights division as a young lawyer and while he was there he prosecuted some of the most significant cases in the country. lawyers in the civil rights division get fanned out to places in the country to handle cases in mississippi and alabama and california and all over and tom was one of those people. he was sent to texas to handle a very significant hate crime case when he was a young lawyer that involved a gang of white supremacists that went on a killing spree and ended up shooting 3 people and killing one when he was a young lawyer working in the civil rights division. he later served as a top deputy for attorney general janet reno, he was special counsel to ted kennedy and ser
makers realize the real issues relate to helping support and extend the civil rights of people today. with autism, that process is still going on, but i am confident because i believe this is a civil rights issue. i believe the united states of america can guarantee the civil rights of all its citizens. thank you very much. i look forward to your questions. >> thank you mr. ne'eman. thank you to reach of the panelists. in regular order, the chair will recognize mr. burton from indiana. >> first of all, i want to thank you all very much. we talked to those people for three hours and you had to sit there. i want to tell you, i am amazed your posteriors could survive that long. the second thing i would like to say is that abraham lincoln said, let the people know the facts and the country will be saved. one of the things that we have is that i do not think there is enough information getting out to the people who are not effected. i was like that. my grandson became artistic, and then all of a sudden it became a cause for me. i was chairman at the time so i had the resources to do somet
of inequality. that is why it is a civil rights issue. those people need choices, but it will have an effect on the individual child and more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say that as well. [applause] >> i would only add standards to that. i think it's important that we as a society, said very clear expectations for what it is. michael is a secretary of state, not in the sense that condoleezza rice was, but as a member of the cabinet there. the secretary of state and the united foundation for education. >> it has been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it is worth traveling across the united states. >> the ultimate compliment. >> the first time i have ever worried about you judging. [laughter] >> he made the point that national security, one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that they recognize it as a moral complex more than anything. and america realizes that they couldn't win these nations in particular. it was a precondition of winning across the globe. if you'll forgive me, but it's the same danger now. the e
: another piece of the expansion of civil rights, the subtle interaction between the supreme court and the popular opinion, the supreme court does respond to popular opinion and therefore, the four publicly embraced referenda that said we are willing -- we and our states want same-sex marriage. that affects the supreme court. >> yes. that's why -- it is an excellent point. that's why these marriage referendums that we just saw in the last election, which for the first time, gay rights advocates won -- all four marriage equality referendums the timing of that was very important because it came just before the supreme court reviewed this. obviously the court is going to look to public opinion to see whether or not the country is ready for same-sex marriage. >> eliot: it is not as though the justice of the court take polls and say 50% is for -- therefore my view of constitutional rights changes. even conservative jurists understand one's sensibility of rights changes as -- there is an evolution. >> over time, it is what
of inequality. that's why it's called a civil rights issue. they need choices. it will have them an effect on the individual child more kids will be better educate and ting will have a effect on the -- so i would say -- [inaudible] [applause] >> i would only add standards. i think it's important as we as a society set expectations for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- not sense that cobbed lee -- condoleezza rice was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation
or comparisons were exaggeration or scores or i had pershly. but after years of working as a civil rights lawyer and advocate, representing victims of racial profiling and police brutality and investigating patterns of drug law enforcement in poor communities of color and attempting to assist people who had been released from prison, re-enter into a society that had never shown much use for them in the first place, i really had a serious of experiences that began my own awakening. i began to awaken to the reality that far from ending kraft in america, we redesigned it. we create aid vast new system that has managed to relegate african americans to a permanent second-class status again. and it does function in a manner eerily reminiscent of the jim crow system. >> rose: we'll come back to the international dimension of this in a moment, but first i want to introduce this clip from the film. tell me about "the house i live in." >> "the house i live in" was a film i tried to make about the war on drugs, to go to about 25 states across the country and sort of really take stock of the whole profile o
and civil rights, etc. there are rights that protect individual human beings who are maybe on the wrong side of a ma juror taryn democracy but that's very different than the minority party in the legislative body. i don't think they have to get some sort of special protections. >> they are our voice. they are the voice of the individual. >> that's what elections are for. that's what elections are for. >> and, likewise, when we talk about majority rule, we're not necessarily talking about the control by the majority party. >> right. >> it's the same principle on the other side. >> explain that. what do you mean? >> well, when we talk about the majority, for example, controlling the house of representatives, what we're talking about is the majority party. we're talking about them controlling it quite thoroughly. as long as he can keep his caucus lined up behind him, he can do essentially what he wants. we see, by the way, what happens, you mentioned the texas legislature. we see this in state legislatures in a lot of states across the country where both houses and governor belong to the same p
-abiding citizens. if he suggested stripping civil rights fromfully any other grimes large or small -- if you said black americans shouldn't be allowed to vote. you would be disciplined or fired tomorrow or later on this afternoon. it's an outrageous thinger to him to do. he's wrong that guns don't enhance safety. fbi's estimate is 750,000 times a year, 2,000 times a day law abiding citizens pull out a pistol and stop themselves from becoming a victim of crime. costas doesn't know what he's talking about. he suggested stripping me and millions of americans of our civil rights. >> there are so many things wrong with what he just said. he shouldn't be fired for expression an opinion. the idea that we live in a society that we can't express an opinion because of people's sensibility. and i never heard a rant. i just heard a person giving his opinion which i think is acceptable. bob costas has been around a long time. he's very respected. the idea that he would be fired over expressing an opinion over a tragedy is shocking. i'm not an anti-gun person. i group with guns. i group alaska. my taught for w
that people make. >> we've come a long way baby, and i still remember just before the civil rights movement when racists and masog masogyists. whatever happened to content of character not color of skin, you can't criticize susan race because she's black and female, what are the rules. >> jon: and we thought we'd play it clip for you from the msnbc anchor. >> mccain tried to make her unnominatable, and would look weak. and mccain inappropriate political attack and gave us the horrible optics of he and lindsey graham as old white establishment folks wrongly and repeatedly attacking a younger black women and moments when they went strongly blue. >> jon: and claims that mccain went on a witch hunt and tarring the ambassador in the press. that's quite a loaded word. >> so many words that he can say that for some reason i can't say. next time we hear the usual suspects in the review and denouncing rush limbo, remember, they were stone cold silent most likely so far on all of this race baiting going on on the rice-mccain issue. >> jon: what about the real issues what are the real issues that the
for support for artistic people that looked nothing like me. this is a civil rights issue. we all have to be included. host: we are talking about the federal response to the rise in optimism with ari ne'eman, the president and co-founder of the artistic self advocacy network -- autistic self advocacy network. our next call comes from florida. go ahead, please. are you there? go right ahead, please. caller: i need to know -- what do you do with a 20-year-old and a 22-year-old that was diagnosed -- has been on medication ever since they were about five years old, and they go from doctor to doctor, and when they take their medication, they look bleary eyed, and we have tried every kind of medication, but they cannot communicate, and the school that they were in -- have been in -- they have been in a group where some of the kids were so bad until they could not -- you cannot learn where there is so much confusion. you can sit down one-on-one with them, and they can pick up some things, and they can easily remember telephone numbers and things that are exciting -- they can remember that, bu
civil rights. but as the tool has become a regular tool of political warfare, scrutiny of the procedure has increased and questions raised about its impact on the chamber. now, reid and other senate democrats want to change the rules to eliminate the 60-vote threshold needed to formally begin debate on a bill; and require a "talking filibuster," forcing senators to make their case on the floor for hours and hours, like jimmy stewart did in the 1939 film "mr. smith goes to washington." >> i'm not, and i'm going to stay right here and fight for this lost cause. >> holman: or former south carolina senator strom thurmond, who spoke for over 24 hours in an attempt to defeat the civil rights act of 1957. but in today's senate, where 60 votes are needed to pass almost any piece of legislation, it means even the threat of a filibuster can gum up the process. democratic leader harry reid says enough is enough. >> we have this crazy idea, mr. president, that if we're going to have a filibuster, you have to stand and say something, not hide in your office someplace or go to a wedding that you're h
on diversity and civil rights. arpaio told the arizona republic he can, quote, get along great with the hispanics. the hispanics? not exactly spreading the love. here's what arpaio said after winning re-election despite an aggressively challenge from a latino activist. >> i would hope to get together with the latino community if i could ever have them talk to me without screaming and threatening me. >> let the charm offenser begin. arpaio's long and ugly history of getting together with the latino community includes a justice department lawsuit accusing him of racial profiling, lawsuits linked to alleged civil rights violations, and the death of a prisoner while in custody. and recently saying he'll arm deputies with automatic weapons so they can hunt down suspected and undocumented immigrants. arpaio says now, quote, i sure would like to meet with latino community leaders, in the backroom or whatever, have a couple of beers and try to explain. meet in the backroom? a couple of beers? does arpaio really think a happy hour can erase his offensive record? not even a nice try, she
them to do as the civil right issue of their time. at the end of the day when you have u.s. citizens citizens andl permanent residents being unlawfully detained in immigration raids you feel like you're a second class citizen. >> the dream act has been floating around for years. republicans introduced the achieve act, yet the hispanic caucus rejected that. why? >> the problem with the achieve act, it doesn't achieve the dream. the dream is to take young people who came here through no choice of their own, their parents brought them, who only flag they recognize and pledge allegiance to is that of the united states, whose only national anthem they know is the star spangled banner, their only country they know is the united states, is a positioned to be a pathway towards earned permanent residency. >> you fought this issue for so long. due think there can be a bipartisan solution? >> for the first time in many years, i am cautiously optimistic. there is a working group of eight senators, four republicans, four democrats, a similar working group is being put together in the house of rep
in cocoa, florida, for harriette and harry moore, leaders of the civil rights movement in florida. harry moore established the first branch of the naacp in brow ward county, florida, and considered the first martyr of the 1950's era civil rights movement. sadly on christmas night in 1951, the moores were killed by a bomb planted beneath their home. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in strong support of this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes mr. clay from missouri. mr. clay: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i, too, want to join with my colleague from arizona in consideration of h.r. 2338 to name the post office in cocoa, florida, after harry t. and harriette moore. in accordance with committee requirements, h.r. 2338 is co-sponsored by all members of the florida delegation and was reported out of the oversight committee by unanimous consent. it honors the legacy of harry t. and harry moore who both fought tirelessly for civil righ
, or latino organizations, it's civil rights organizations, the labor movement, it's evangelicals, parts of the business community. there will be immigration reform in 2013 and the president will be forced to sign something that gets through congress whether he wants to or not. it's clear he does want to. >> it appears he wants to. the dream act, here we are in lame duck again, lame duck in 2010 was the great exciting moment for progressives. a thousand things that hadn't happened pineally happened. no particular conversation about another dream act again. >> let's keep in mind. i'm not as optimistic about the future of ledge indication as you. in the context of the immigration problem, immigration policy problem, let's say, in the united states, dreamers and the dream act is symbolic. it aekts a lot of people. it's symbolic in a universe where we have 10 million or 11 million or however many in the shadows. we have 141,000 visas a year. what the hell is that? >> it's that history, right? >> it is that history. >> it's bur okay tra advertised this kind of stuff. it's not a solution of ex
station back on new year aday in 2009. at 9:00, two civil rights lawyers will argue before the 9th sir coit court of appeals that b.a.r.t. police should not get legal immin tu from this lawsuit filed bay the -- ill munty from this lawsuit filed by the the -- immunity from this lawsuit filed by the family of oscar grant. >>> coming up at 7:47, how the kansas city chiefs and their community responded to the jovan belcher tragedy. >>> four people including three firefighters are still in the hospital this morning after a serious accident in other rin da. it happened on -- orinda. it happened on eastbound 24 near wilder road. it all started when an suv crashed into the center divide. while one of the drivers and three firefighters were standing on the right shoulder, another suv lost control pushing another car into them. they were all rushed to the hospital with major injuries. >>> the weekend storm brought major problems to the south bay and that had actuallity workers and law enforcement working overtime. a man, woman and child were were stuck in their car after flooding on east capita
in this fashion, and use them in unprecedented numbers. host: and according to history, civil rights was one of those things the filibuster got used for. >> what's interesting about those is while it wasn't a partisan issue, it was a factual issue. dirksen was a great hero of the civil rights revolution right alongside his partner, lyndon johnson. it was the southern democrats, but at the -- that point in time, it was the southern democrats that wanted to talk and one held a record of talking for 24 hours straight. these are filibusters where they don't want to take the floor and they have no interest in debating. it's all to block things. when you get a filibuster when you have bills that pass unanimously, it becomes clear that this was not a matter of principle over a particular bill but a tool of obstruction. host: randy in minnesota, republican line, good morning. go ahead. caller: yes. good morning, c-span. this filibuster thing, this is the perfect way for our government to work the way our government was set up to work with checks and balances. with the filibuster rule, -- i'm getting
people and that's a high-tech in equality and that's why i've called it a civil rights issue. those people make choices, but it will have them an affect on individual child or kids would be better educated, and i think you'll have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say school choice. [applause] >> i would only add standards. it's important we as a society said very clear expectations, for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- as a member of the cabinet, secretary of state for education in the united kingdom where i got educated. so i look inward -- i look forward to hearing your questions. >> thank you very much. i just want to say, it's been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach on united. [laughter] >> the ultimate compliment. >> to hear you speak. >> the first time i've ever worried about -- [laughter] >> but you made the point that you're changing things and they also matter -- [inaudible] one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that it recognize this is a moral conflict much than anything else. and america realized tha
come with me on the civil rights bill, you will be remembered for 200 years. only you and lincoln will be remembered. on the other hand, he gave dirkson every public works project dam that was going to sink illinois. lincoln did the same thing, what ever he was needed, assignments, jobs, the years before civil service. it was easier to do some of this then. >> the guy that stole the movie as far as i'm concerned was the same guy that stole that oliver stone movie "jfk" is tommy lee jones. tommy lee jones, playing thaddeus stevens, my hero, the guy that really did believe in emancipation and reconstruction and 40 acres and a mule and wanted to take the freed african-american and make him a full citizen economically, not just under the law. tell me about that guy. we can talk about lincoln forever. thaddeus stevens, his housekeeper was also his mistress. i loved that scene when we discover that. it is a great performance as well as everything else. >> well, what's so powerful about both tommy lee jones performance and the actual thaddeus stevens is what lincoln had to do was to pers
the country? and all the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand-your-ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone. they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, mars, proctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed. and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators. we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> all right, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan, and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in looking at them. and i
of the fruitvale bart station. this morning at 9:00 if two oakland civil rights attorneys will be arguing for the ninth circuit court of appeals. arguing bart police officers should not receive legal immunity against a civil lawsuit filed by grant's family. last year a federal judge ruled to allow the lawsuit to move ahead. the police officers appealed that ruling to the ninth circuit court. >>> this is a seventh day of a strike at the nation's busiest port. clerical workers at the ports of los angeles and long beach set up picket lines last tuesday. they have been trying to negotiate a new contract for 2.5 years. they are also claiming their jobs are being outsourced out of the state and across the pacific ocean. now officials at the port deny that charge. the list of the dock workers are not crossing the picket lines and say the strike is costing the port as much as $1 billion every day. >>> major development on treasure island is moving forward. they now have until the end of the month to choose a new home to make way for the development. $1.5billion project includes up to 8,000 new ho
marijuana and meth, theft, robbery and civil rights violations. he was caught in a federal sting operation in february of last year with the guilty plea he faces minimum of 10 years. >>> san francisco's supervisors are set to take a final vote this afternoon to amend the building code to reduce square footage requirement for residental units the microapartments would be 220 square feet, the measure initially passed after supervisor weiner it would be for new construction only. he also agreed to captain initial round of building permits at 375 microapartments. rents are expected to go for 1500 to 2,000 a month. >>> when it has raining like it has been, my kids want to know can we play outside at recess, is there going to be football in our future? >> [ inaudible ] >> looks like north bay where we'll have steadier rain during the daylight, 5:00 all that rain is going to start spreading south, right now sprinkles northwest corner, sonoma county all of us could have sprinkles any time today, visibility unlimited not dealing with fog or rain this morning. mainly in oregon and eureka and crescen
countries should aspire. it's kind of flattering. our civil rights advance, one that was hard fought, but one. so far this treaty has been signed by 154 countries including the u.s. it's been ratified by 126 nations, not including the u.s. president obama, in other words, signed it a couple years ago, but it's not been ratified by the united states senate. to be clear, this treaty would not require anything from us at all. we already have disability rights. it just pushes other countries to do what we have done. we would commit on an international level to what we already believe in here. ratifying that treaty would help us lead the rest of the world to catch up to that historic leap that we took as a country when president bush signed that legislation. with the exception of a black helicopter conspiracy theory on the right championed by failed senator rick santorum, he, who i should mention is a columnist at a birther website, that's his job now, except for his nutso theories ratifying this treaty was a political no brainer. it has bipartisan support. this has the real thing. real b
. back to you. >> mike, thank you. macarthur accused police are trying to destroy his civil rights. police have declined to comment about the case. >>> the baltimore woman accused of killing her child, is out of the hospital and is being held without bail tonight. mary is live in the newsroom with the latest on this. >> nicole fitzgerald is facing abuse charges in the death of 2- year-old paris. you can see the wound she inflicted on herself attempting to cut her throat. when officers arrived at her home, they found a 32-year-old holding a knife. they found her son dead from multiple stab wounds. fitzgerald is also charged with assault and reckless endangerment. denise? >> the little boy's aunt and uncle say fitzgerald has been dealing with health problems. >>> a man is arrested after going off an embankment. just after noon today. the car went off winter's run road. coming to a stop. rescue crews pulled a 21-year- old man from the car and he was flown to shock trauma. his condition is unknown at this point. >>> another troubling incident tonigh
about it or were willing to put everything on the line to make it happen. but in the civil rights era, for example, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in a sense. they were factional. the fact is that the filibusters done by southern democratic senators who opposed civil rights are voting rights legislation were opposed by republicans. just as they were by a non-southern democrats. and the fact is that civil rights legislation and overcoming those filibusters are being enacted were as much to the credit and responsibility of the senate minority leader as lyndon johnson. so what we have seen is a regular use of the filibuster tool. the entire party is fashioned by the majority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not simply on those issues where the majority leader though the amendment. but on issues and nominations which ultimately passed unanimously or near unanimously. keep in mind nominations, in which he denied unanimous consent, in some instances have been the luster, a lot of them on executive nomination, you don't have amendme
civil rights and they said that the senate was ending revenge for gettysburg and the rules of the senate have lent themselves -- back then, it blocked civil rights but it wasn't a work a day kind of obstructionist. as horrible as it was blocking civil rights legislation. today is it is almost everything. you need 60 votes. it doesn't even -- the majority leader can't even bring a bill up to debate without a 60 votes if the minority wants to force 60 votes. that's got to change. the selection -- the confirmation of federal judges and less than cabinet level appointees, those kinds of things are just obstructionism, period. when in the past, we always were able to just bring it forward to get 51 votes. if you don't, you don't. some of these votes will be more aimed to that. certainly to give the minority rights to slow things down but not to block things. almost haphazardly the way they do. >> bill: otherwise it is the tyranny of the minority. >> it really has become that way. so much of what the preside
intensely about it, where will put everything on the line to make it happen. in the civil rights era, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibuster's done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights in a deflation were opposed by republicans, just as they were by non- southern democrats. the fact is that civil rights and legislation and overcoming this filibuster's and being enacted which at least as much to the credit and responsibility of everett dirksen, the minority leader, as to lyndon johnson. what we have seen is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool, and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party has fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues where the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near it unanimously. keep in mind on nominations, where holds w
texas. he helped write the civil rights act of 1964, the voting rights act. he didn't care much for president nixon, even saying he would have voted to impeach him the day he was inaugurated but it wouldn't have looked good. he helped draft nixon's articles of impeachment. brooks ran the kennedy presidential campaign in his texas district. he was also there the day he was killed and stood next to lyndon johnson as he was sworn in on air force one. by the way according to "the new york times", one of johnson's aides said brooks was one of the few men johnson was ever afraid of. brooks died at a baptist hospital from a sudden illness. he was 89 years old. >>> well, the president and republicans agree on very little in their fiscal proposals. with one glaring exception. neither proposal specifically includes defense cuts. in fact, both sides have gone out of their way to say they shouldn't happen. but if there's no deal, they may happen anyway. in today's "deep dive" how the sequester could impact our military, our economy, and our safety. the budget control act calls for about a t
baby, and i still remember just before the civil rights movement when racists and masog masogyists. whatever happened to content of character not color of skin, you can't criticize susan race because she's black and female, what are the rules. >> jon: and we thought we'd play it clip for you from the msnbc anchor. >> mccain tried to make her unnominatable, and would look weak. and mccain inappropriate political attack and gave us the horrible optics of he and lindsey graham as old white establishment folks wrongly and repeatedly attacking a younger black women and moments when they went strongly blue. >> jon: and claims that mccain went on a witch hunt and tarring the ambassador in the press. that's quite a loaded word. >> so many words that he can say that for some reason i can't say. next time we hear the usual suspects in the review and denouncing rush limbo, remember, they were stone cold silent most likely so far on all of this race baiting going on on the rice-mccain issue. >> jon: what about the real issues what are the real issues that the media should be raising here? >> t
believe it's rights for everyone, this is a civil right for me. i went to two weddings this summer, a same-sex couple and a heterosexual couple and they were equally beautiful and lovely. all i kent skept saying is why would anyone want to deeye nigh this to any human being. >> i agree. why? what could we -- how could we possibly be threatening other people who want to marry other people? it's just -- it's just not right. >> well, guys, as i said, ain't love grand. i hope you're together for a million years. >> thank you, don. >> thank you. >>> what does your smartphone say about you according to a new study? the phone you use could say a lot about your maturity and your dating life. i'll explain next. 50 percent more [yodeling] yodel-ay-ee-oo. 50% more flash. [ southern accent ] 50 percent more taters. that's where tots come from. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. 50% more spy stuff. what's in your wallet? this car is too small. dating life
's life is threatened by this legislation. joining him is fellow civil rights carrie kennedy. the center awarded frank for his efforts in uganda. good to have you here. you've been fighting this bill for years. david cato who is a friend of yours, recently killed in uganda for his work against fighting this bill. you've taken over his work. but are you basically handing yourself a death sentence by being on a program like this putting yourself in a line of fire? >> yes. i've been fighting this legislation for a long time now and if this legislation is passed into law, i will definitely be put life in prison or life -- or sentenced to death. and right knew, i'm here in new york with the human rights and have been providing a lot of support in trying to stop this legislation. the speaker says she wants to pass it as a christmas gift for ugandans. >> it is the pipeline, moved through a certain lower form of government there working up for a vote within parliament. carrie, why does the rfk center want to highlight a sister like frank and what is taking place in uganda? in america we're celeb
in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: lawmakers stepped up the rhetoric, but grew no closer today to agreement on how to avoid slipping over the so- called fiscal cliff. but each side demanded the other compromise. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> i have to just tell you that is a... that is a bad strategy for america, it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a game that i will play. >> reporter: president obama today, in washington, assured business executives he'll reject attempts to link the fiscal cliff budget negotiations to future increases in the nation's debt ceiling. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing limit. >> if congress in any way sugg
know, howard baker was everett dirkson's son-in-law. and during the run up to the civil rights bill, howard is sitting up in dirkson's office, phone rings, dirkson picks it up, says -- and all howard can say is him saying, mr. president, i just can't come down tonight, i was there last night. i was there the night before, i just got to go home. hangs up. 20 minutes passed, and he hears beagles barking in the hallway outside his office. and lbj walks in with his dogs. so because he wouldn't come down to see him, johnson called a car, got in and came up to just force a conversation with dirkson. >> and lyndon johnson -- >> and we got a bill. >> and by the way, l lyndon johnson. he's so detached and disconnected from the hill, he would call, mark haleprin, famously, subcommittee chairman in the house. and say, hey, i hear the mark-up didn't go very well today. do you need any help? what can i do? do you need me to call anybody? how can i push this along? again, we're not heaping all the blame on the president. let me underline again. >> yeah. >> john boehner's counter offer was patheti
leader and role model. he supported civil rights bills, refused to sign the southern manifesto in 19 of a an helped write the historical civil rights act. may we also remember congressman jack brooks. he was a great man, a political figure, a u.s. marine veteran and a friend that i'll never forget. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: ask unanimous consent to address how it's for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, starting at the age of 15, i worked any job i could find to support myself throughout college. manually dug ditches, construction work, plant work. after college i found an entry-level position in the field in which i sturdied. and with hard work i have constantly been employed for 36 years and now i'm near retirement. i've never requested or received any federal financial assistance. i enjoy contributing to my community and my church and this is my american dream. now this administration want
's most bright, great jazz musicians, he was also a fighter for civil rights and justice. bill cosby reflects on his extraordinary life next. the holidays are here and we're here with cyreeta talking about the walmart low price guarantee. that's your receipt from another store? it is! let's put it to the test. alright! that's walmart's everyday low price. get out! ok, but i'm taking these! ready? yes. there you have it! that much? that's the walmart low price guarantee. see for yourself. bring in your last receipt and see how much you can save. be ready. with the season's tastiest brands. like nestle toll house morsels. bake the very best this season. walmart has everything you need to be ready for holiday hosting. with our low price guarantee backed by ad match. walmart. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. yep. the longer you stay with us, the more you save. and when you switch from another company to us, we even reward you
of civilization. it's stored right here. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. >> jennifer: injureyou're back inside "the war room." i'm jennifer granholm. we have movies that matter series. i'll tell but a movie that is causing a buzz. it's called "chasing ice"." >> i never imagined you could sees glaciers disappearing in such a short time. the initial goal was to put out 25 cameras for three years. shoot every hour as long as it was daylight to show you how the landlandscape was changing. >> the landscape is gone and it may never be seen again in the history of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was ab
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